PROTECTING NATUROPATHIC PHYSICIANS

Mike Whitmer

Assistant Vice President, Insurance Programs

Mike Whitmer is assistant vice president of insurance programs at NCMIC. With over 25 years' experience in insurance and finance, Mike has in-depth information to share with NDs. He is responsible for NCMIC's corporate relations team and directing risk management education efforts for doctors, students and colleges. Working with healthcare providers through the years has made Mike a skilled risk manager who is knowledgeable about strategies for managing both clinical and business risk. From information on insurance needs for ND practices to clinical tips to protect yourself and your patients, Mike is here to help NDs identify and manage their risk. 

Blog/News posts by this Author:

  • Malpractice insurance to protect your patients, practice and reputation

    To help you make an informed decision on your coverage, we've prepared the Guide to Malpractice Insurance for Naturopathic Physicians, a resource to answer your questions about the nuts and bolts of malpractice coverage.

  • Should I Charge Patients Who Don't Show up?

    Question: Lately, it seems like more of my patients have missed appointments without canceling in advance. It's beginning to affect my bottom line. So, I'm wondering if I should I begin charging patients who don't show up for appointments?

  • An Early Call May Help You Avoid a Claim

    While visiting with doctors at a naturopathic college, I was reminded of the unique relationship between the naturopathic doctor and NCMIC as the insurance company. At NCMIC, we prefer that you call to discuss situations even before there is any hint of a claim.

  • Should You Refund Patient Fees?

    Many N.D.s have patients who request their money back after care is provided. Should you agree to refund patient fees?

  • When a Patient Doesn't Show Up

    Some NDs have been frustrated when patients miss appointments without canceling in advance. Although it's a cost of doing business, it can affect the bottom line when it happens too often. What should you do?

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